PAGE 2    This page describes the line from Syston to Melton Junction.
This section of line opened on September 1st 1846 to a temporary station in Melton Mowbray east of the present station. There were stations at Rearsby, Brooksby and Asfordby when the line opened, with another at Frisby opened on January 1st 1847.

syston 1

syston 2

syston 3

SYSTON STATION  FIRST STATION OPENED 5/5/1840 ON MIDLAND COUNTIES RY. S&P OPENED 1/9/1846. NEW SYSTON STATION OPENED WHEN MAIN LINE IS QUADRUPLED, 1874. STATION CLOSED 4/3/1968. 

 SYSTON NORTH CURVE OPENED 1854.     BLOCK TELEGRAPH INTRODUCED SYSTON TO MELTON 1875, WHICH IS WEHN THE FIRST SIGNAL BOXES WOULD HAVE BEEN BUILT.

syston plan

syston a

AN EDWARDIAN VIEW OF THE STATION BUILDING ON A VERY GLOOMY DAY - A LOCO CAN JUST BE MADE OUT APPROACHING UNDER THE FOOTBRIDGE.


SYSTON B

SYSTON SOUTH JUNCTION IN 1922 WITH A DOUBLE HEADED GOODS HEADING SOUTH ON THE MAIN LINE..... AN EVERYDAY SIGHT
AT THE TIME.


SYSTON C

RUNNING NORTH THROUGH THE STATION ON THE SAME DAY WAS A MAIN LINE PASSENGER TRAIN BEHIND 4-4-0 No 499.





syston 4

4F No 44113 WITH A TRAIN FOR GREAT YARMOUTH (VAUXHALL) IS ABOUT TO TAKE THE S&P LINE AT SYSTON SOUTH JUNCTION. THE TRAIN WOULD HAVE TAKEN THE M&GN ROUTE TO YARMOUTH, BUT THAT ROUTE HAD CLOSED WHEN THE PICTURE WAS TAKEN ON 4th AUGUST 1962.  PHOTO G.D. KING

syston 5

9F No 92118 COMES OFF THE S&P LINE AT SYSTON SOUTH JUNCTION ON 4tH AUGUST 1962. PHOTO G.D. KING.

syston 6

A BIRMINGHAM TO CAMBRIDGE TRAIN LEAVING SYSTON BEHIND 2P No 40452 ON 28th SEPTEMBER 1959.  PHOTO G.D. KING.

syston 7

A LOCAL TRAIN FROM THE S&P LINE RUNS INTO SYSTON BEHIND CAPROTTI CLASS 5MT No 73138 ON 2nd AUGUST 1961. PHOTO G.D. KING.

SYSTON D

PULLING AWAY FROM SYSTON STATION WITH THE 6.40pm LEICESTER TO PETERBOROUGH LOCAL IS B17 4-6-0 61657, ON APRIL 13th 1960.


SYSTON E

A SOUTHBOUND LOCAL TRAIN STANDS AT THE PLATFORM IN 1960.

SYSTON F

A STANIER MOGUL IS UNUSUAL MOTIVE POWER FOR THE PETERBOROUGH TO LEICETER TRAIN ON 27th JULY 1963, SEEN APPROACHING SYSTON STATION.





syston 8
AN UNUSUAL VIEW OF THE EAST JUNCTION TAKEN FROM THE TENDER OF AN 8F.

syston 9

syston 10

THE GOODS YARD IN USE AS A CEMENT DEPOT IN 1982.

SYSTON G


THE APPROACH TO THE GOODS YARD IN 1982; THE BUILDINGS MAY WELL DATE BACK TO THE ORIGINAL MIDLAND COUNTIES STATION.


SYSTON H

I BELEIVE THIS WAS THE ORIGINAL STATION MASTER'S HOUSE FROM THE FIRST STATION OPENED BY THE MCR.

swanwick junction

SYSTON STATION BUILDING WAS TAKEN DOWN BY THE MIDLAND RAILWAY CENTRE AND REBUILT AT SWANWICK JUNCTION WHEN IT
WAS THREATENED WITH DEMOLITION IN THE MID 2000's.   THE SITE WAS BEING REDEVELOPED FOR HOUSING. THIS PHOTO SHOWS THE
BUILDING NEARING COMPLETION IN 2012.




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Syston North Junction in 1985; the signal box still has the MR nameboard.

syston 12

The road bridge adjacent to Syston East Junction in 1985.

syston 13

The road bridge next to the North Junction signal box, possibly dating back to the Midland Counties Railway.

syston 14

North Junction signal box.

syston 15

Syaston South Junction; the only way to photograph it was from a train. Happily in those days you could lean out of a window!

syston 16


QUENIBOROUGH. 

BETWEEN SYSTON AND REARSBY LIES QUENIBOROUGH WHERE A PLATFORM FOR A MUNITIONS FACTORY WAS OPENED ON 10/11/1941. A SIGNAL BOX WAS OPENED THE PREVIOUS DAY.
THE PLATFORM LINES AND RUN ROUND WERE CLOSED ON 8/2/1970, AND THE SIGNAL BOX CLOSED ON 19/12/1976 WITH IBS SIGNALS INSTALLED IN ITS PLACE. 


QUEN GE




QUEN 2

A TOTON TO BRENT COAL TRAIN PASSING QUENIBOROUGH BEHIND A 'CROSTI' 9F LOCO AROUND 1960; THE FACTORY IS ON THE LEFT.





QUEN 4

ANOTHER 9F POWERED COAL TRAIN HEADS EAST PAST QUENIBOROUGH; THE SIDINGS ON THE LEFT ARE BEING USED FOR COACHES,
AND THE WARTIME AUSTERITY SIGNAL BOX IS ON THE RIGHT.


QUEN 5


THE VIEW FROM THE FOOTPLATE OF AN 8F ON A FREEZING DAY IN THE EARLY 1960'S, BETWEEN QUENIBOROUGH AND REARSBY.


                                                 


rearsby 1
rearsby 2

The only picture I have seen of Rearsby station before it closed, a delightful Edwardian view which shows the unusual shelter on the Melton platform.

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REARSBY  OPENED 1/9/1846.  CLOSED 2/4/1951.  REMAINS AT SITE; STATION BUILDING (PRIVATE HOUSE).

rearsby when open

A RARE VIEW OF REARSBY BEFORE CLOSURE, WITH AN LMS TOTEM NAMEBOARD ON THE RIGHT. 


rearsby 14

REARSBY STATION ON 15th AUGUST 1955, WITH A PETERBOROUGH TO LEICESTER TRAIN BEHIND 2P 4-4-0 40525.
THE LEICESTER PLATFORM HAS ALREADY BEEN CUT BACK BUT THE STATION BUILDING IS NOT FENCED OFF FROM THE RUNNING LINE.
Photo H. Priestfield, courtesy of Peter Churchman.


rearsby 5

A view of the station in 1963; the Leicester platform has been cut back but the Melton one remains intact.

REARSBY WITH CROSTI

Probably taken at the same time, a Crosti 9F approaches the crossing from the Melton direction.



rearsby 6

Two views of the station building in 1983, remarkaby little changed.

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rearsby 8

This shot was taken in 2008; the new extension on the near end has been tastefully done.

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rearsby 10

rearsby 11



rearsby 12

Half a mile beyond Rearsby staion another lane crosses the line; in 1983 this attractive cottage remained in place but it has since been demolished.

rearsby 13

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BROOKSBY OPENED 1/9/1846 CLOSED 3/7/1961 PASSENGERS, 4/5/1964 GOODS. REMAINS AT SITE: STATION BUILDING (PRIVATE HOUSE). REMNANT OF PLATFORM.

AFTER CLOSURE, BROOKSBY SIGNAL BOX WAS MOVED TO THE ADJACENT SPORTS GROUND TO USE AS A SCORER'S BOX.



brooksby 3

An Edwardian view of the station showing the main building; the different architecture was due to the influence of nearby Brooksby Hall. The shelter
on the left is a Midland Railway addition.

brooksby sta

The station in 1957 with a train for Leicester. 

brooksby 1

A superb view of the station looking towards Syston with a train signalled. 

BROOKSBY NEW




brooksby 4

The substantial house at the far end of the building has been demolished but the station building itself remains in place. This view was taken in 1982.

BROOK X 1

Two views of the crossing in 1982; the station was on the left in the upper view.

BROOK X 2


brooksby 5

Taken in 2008 this shot shows that it is still well maintained.

brooksby 6

After closure the signal box was taken onto the adjacent cricket field, owned by Brooksby College; it served as the scorers box.
Even allowing for the loss of its roof it looks pretty shabby in this picture taken in 1984, and at some point since then it disappeared.


frisby 1

 ON 26th SEPTEMBER 1959 2P No 40543 PULLS OUT OF BROOKSBY ON A LEICSTER - PETERBOROUGH LOCAL. PHOTO G.D. KING.

 THE LEVEL CROSSING OF A MINOR ROAD BETWEEN BROOKSBY & FRISBY.....THE SIGNAL HAS GONE AND THE SIGNS ARE MODERN, BUT LITTLE ELSE HAS CHANGED IN TWENTY FIVE YEARS OR SO.

FRISBY 2

FRISBY 3


frisby 4
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frisby 6

FRISBY   OPENED 1/1/1847 FOR MARKET DAY TRAINS - APPEARED IN PUBLIC TIMETABLE FROM 1/4/1849.    CLOSED 3/7/61  NO GOOD FACILITIES.  REMAINS AT SITE; LMS SIGNAL BOX, OPENED 23/2/1941


frisby 21

You couldn't accuse the cottage of being an architectural masterpiece! This is the view looking towards Leicester in the 1950's.


frisby 11

Frisby in the 1960's, with an Austerity 2-8-0 on a goods photographed from the signal box.

Below - the station in 1957.

frisby sta




frisby 7

In 1984 much remained, including the station cottage and a Midland lamp hut.

frisby 8

frisby 9

By 2008 only the signal box marked where the station had been; his has been given double glazed window units and a new staircase..

frisby 10

frisby cottage

frisby shelters


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ASFORDBY OPENED 1/9/1846 AS 'KIRBY' CLOSED 2/4/1951 TO PASSENGERS, 4/5/1964 TO GOODS. REMAINS AT SITE: NOTHING OF NOTE.


BY THE TIME I VISITED ASFORDBY STATION THE WHOLE SITE HAD BEEN CLEARED, SO THESE 1950'S PHOTO'S ARE ALL I HAVE.

asforby ticket
asfordby 2


THE SURVIVAL OF THE ORIGINAL SHORT PLATFORM UNTIL 1951 IS REMARKABLE, AND GIVES A GOOD INDICATION OF HOW THE OTHER
STATIONS MUST HAVE LOOKED IN THE EARLY DAYS. IT WAS RAISED IN 1886, SO ONE WONDERS HOW LOW THE ORIGINAL MUST HAVE
BEEN. SADLY MOST OF THE ORIGINAL CHIMNEYS HAVE BEEN SHORTENED, PROBABLY BECAUSE THE TALL STACKS BECAME UNSAFE.

asfordby 3

 
The picture above was taken by a photographer from the Leicester Mercury, as a station closure in 1951 was unusual enough to be newsworthy. 

The young lady, Jo Harrison. was thirteen at the time and just happened to be at home when the photographer called. Her father Ted Harrison was the
station master and the family lived in the station house. When the station closed they were moved to Kibworth station. 

She recalls the station being connected to the electricity supply while they lived there; before that they used candles and oil lamps, pretty much the same
as in 1846!  Each room had a fireplace of course which kept the house warm and the kitchen had a coal fired stove. The water supply was from a pump which
had two handles, one for drinking water and one for rain water.  The pump stood in an enclosed yard next to the level crossing (in the foreground in the top photograph)
which also contained the coal house and the toilet.

The paintwork on the doors of the station was brown, but whether this was newly applied paint by the LMS or very old Midland railway paint isn't certain.


The waiting room had polished wooden benches right round it, and flowers were placed in it each day in the Summer.  

Next to the level crossing was a cottage occupied by a platelayer called Mr Flint, and he cultivated a garden alongside the track and next to the Leicester platform
on which stood a small waiting shelter.

The Harrison family had a garden on the Melton side of the line, with a large plum tree. 

The siding at the station was mostly used for coal deliveries to the local coal merchants. Local small goods were dealt with in the goods shed and
wicker baskets of pigeons were often seen...she remembers being allowed to release the birds for the start of their race.

Staff at the station included a female porter called Peggy Kempin.  Kirby Bellars was considered to be the local village to the station and social life was centred
here despite the name on the station nameboards. 

After the station closed the house remained in use, the home of the Dorren family. Mr Dorren was the relief station master for the area, working from Syston eastwards until
he was transferred to the Birmingham area later in the 1950's. 

 



asforby new picture

THE SMALL BRICK BUILDING TO THE LEFT OF THE MAIN STATION IS A LATER M.R. ADDITION.  NO PICTURES HAVE HET BEEN FOUND
OF THE LEICESTER PLATFORM ON WHICH THE PHOTOGRAPHER IS STANDING. THIS PICTURES DATES FROM 1957.

ASFORDY KIRBY LANE

THE QUALITY OF THIS PICTURE TAKEN FROM THE ROAD OUTSIDE THE STATION ISN'T GREAT, BUT IT IS PROBABLY THE ONLY ONE EVER TAKEN THERE SO IT IS AN IMPORTANT RECORD OF THIS SIDE OF THE STATION. 


ASFORDBY STA COLOUR

ASFORDBY STATION IN 1962, POSSIBLY THE ONLY COLOUR PICTURE TAKEN OF IT.     PHOTO BY TERRY TRACEY

 

THE STATION BUILDINGS AND PLATFORMS WERE DEMOLISHED IN 1967.

asfordby 5

asfordby 4

In 2008 it is hard to imagine that a station ever stood here.

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